Audubon protects birds with banding program

An ovenbird rests on the hand of biologist Emily Patterson, who is working with the Bedford Audubon Society on a project this summer. (Courtesy of the Bedford Audubon Society)

An ovenbird rests on the hand of biologist Emily Patterson, who is working with the Bedford Audubon Society on a project this summer. (Courtesy of the Bedford Audubon Society)

This summer marked the Bedford Audubon Society’s sixth season of bird banding as part of the Institute for Bird Population’s Monitoring Avian Productivity & Survivorship (MAPS) program.

MAPS data provides information relating to the ecology, conservation, and management of North American landbird populations, and the factors responsible for declines in their populations. Bedford Audubon is one of more than 500 sites across the country collecting data on the age, sex, stage of molt, breeding success, and migration return rates of these birds.

Bedford Audubon’s naturalist-in-residence, Tait Johansson, leads the society’s MAPS program, and is joined by summer field biologist Emily Patterson. Ms. Patterson is studying biology and environmental studies at St. Olaf College in Minnesota and has five years of mist netting and banding experience as a volunteer at Braddock Bay Bird Observatory in Rochester.

“Conservation dollars are scarce and precious,” Ms. Patterson said. “Programs like MAPS help ensure that we’re focusing limited resources on the most critical portion of a bird’s life cycle.”

Bedford Audubon invites the public for a morning of citizen science and bird banding at the James Ramsay Hunt & Mary Welsh Memorial Parker Memorial Sanctuary — a unique and rare experience. Please email Tait Johansson at [email protected] to be placed on the activity list.

“Not only is MAPS an important conservation tool for the scientific community, it also provides a unique opportunity for the public to engage in citizen science and our local bird populations,” said Janelle Robbins, Bedford Audubon’s executive director. “Where else can you see a bird’s feathers, whether dramatically striped or beautifully spotted, up close in the wild?”

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  • Savetheearthgirl

    I am very
    surprised at our local Democratic party in town. The national Audubon Society is
    a jewel of an organization. But I wonder what is going on in the minds of the local
    board of directors of Bedford Audubon hosting a fundraiser for Justin Wagner,
    who is running against Dr. Terrence Murphy for state Senate. Dr. Murphy was
    picked to succeed Greg Ball, who has always been a strong supporter of
    nonprofits. Whether it is the IRS or the Audubon Society, getting involved in
    local politics is never a good idea.
    https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/aug24wagner

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